International Moon Day, 20 July


Photo: ESA

 

For thousands of years, human civilisations have looked up to the sky pondering the origin and mysteries of the Moon - our only natural satellite. Ground-based observations enabled by the invention of the first telescopes opened a new chapter in our understanding of our celestial companion.

With the birth of space activities, the Moon became the ultimate destination of countless missions, including crewed flights that brought the first human footprints to another place in the universe.

As Moon exploration efforts continue taking shape with ambitious plans, this global celebration will serve not only as a reminder of success in the past but as an annual testimony to future endeavours.

 

International Moon Day (IMD) was declared on 9 December 2021 by the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in Resolution A/RES/76/76, building upon the recommendation of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. This commemorative day will be observed annually on 20 July.

20 July was chosen as International Moon Day to honour the anniversary of the first landing of humans on the Moon. This was accomplished by the Apollo 11 mission, during which Neil Armstrong and Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin set foot on the Moon's surface as the first humans while Michael Collins awaited their return in the Columbia Command Module in Moon orbit. This marked a historic feat in Moon exploration and paved the way for future research and discovery.

International Moon Day was proclaimed to celebrate the achievements of all States in the exploration of the Moon. It additionally aims to raise public awareness about sustainable Moon exploration and utilisation.

Celebrate with us!

All United Nations Member States, organizations of the United Nations system, other international and regional organizations, as well as civil society, including non-governmental organizations and individuals, are invited to observe International Moon Day.

 

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